Tours

Thank You for an exciting 2014 season!  The 2015 tour schedule will be posted in the spring

 

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photo: Historic postcard – J. Scott Sawyer

Mt. McGregor

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Mt. McGregor is the home to two very different and unusual sites-the General Ulysses S. Grant Cottage and Mt. McGregor Correctional Facility. The former is the cottage where General Grant spent his final months completing his memoirs before succumbing to throat cancer in 1885. Just over the fence is a compound of buildings that sprawls along the mountaintop and was constructed in 1912 as a tuberculosis hospital by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to care for its afflicted employees. This institutional campus is comprised largely of Arts and Crafts influenced buildings, but its gem is a Mission style chapel containing a recently discovered altar painting by early 20th century artist Elliot Dangerfield. By the 1940s the hospital had become a veteran’s camp, and then a center for people with developmental disabilities. After a period of vacancy the site reopened in 1976 as a medium security prison. This will be the final opportunity to tour the prison as it is closing this summer. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and Wilton Heritage Society members and $45 for non-members. FULL

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Valcour Island I
Friday, June 13, 2014

The waters surrounding Valcour Island in Lake Champlain were the scene of the Battle of Valcour, an important naval battle during the Revolutionary War. Here in October 1776, a small colonial fleet under the command of Benedict Arnold engaged the British fleet. During the 19th century, the island was briefly home to a fledgling “free-love” colony and, in 1874, a lighthouse was built on it. The island is now part of the Forest Preserve and the lighthouse is being restored by the Clinton County Historical Association. We will travel by boat to the island for a four-mile interpretive hike with AARCHs Steven Engelhart and naturalist David Thomas-Train. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. Suggested donation is $40 for AARCH and CCHA members and $50 for non-members.
There will be a second tour on September 8.

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2-NIGHTS
Beyond the Blue Line: Discovering the Hudson Valley
Wednesday, June 25 – Friday, June 27, 2014
Registration and cancellation deadline: June 9

This 3-day tour begins in Kingston Wednesday afternoon with a walking tour of the Colonial era Stockade Area National Historic District led by the Friends of Historic Kingston. You’ll then cross the river to Rhinebeck and check in to your accommodations at the Beekman Arms and Delemater Inn, the country’s oldest hotel in continuous operation. Take advantage of some free time before dinner at Beekman Arms to explore historic Rhinebeck, brimming with a variety of shops along scenic tree-lined streets.
blueline14Thursday, a coach will be provided to shuttle the group to three very different sites. You’ll begin with a boat tour to Bannerman Castle. The castle was built in 1901 by munitions dealer Frank Bannerman as his personal estate, but also as a storage site for his extensive inventory of ammunitions that he could no longer store legally in Brooklyn. The lunchtime stop is in Poughkeepsie, at the Walkway Over the Hudson, a former train trestle that has been converted into a pedestrian bridge that spans the Hudson. At 212 feet tall and 1.28 miles long, it is the longest, elevated pedestrian bridge in the world and provides expansive views of the river. The day wraps up with a visit to the privately owned Astor Courts. Commissioned in 1902 by John Jacob Astor IV, Astor Courts was designed by Stanford White as part of the Astor’s Ferncliff estate. Intended as a recreational facility it housed an indoor pool, tennis court, squash courts, bowling alley and shooting range.

blueline142Two more historic house tours round out the itinerary on Friday. First is Wilderstein, an elaborate Queen Anne style residence with interiors designed by Joseph Burr Tiffany, and landscape attributed to Calvert Vaux. Home to the Suckley family for three generations, the last resident was Margaret (Daisy) Suckley, a cousin and confidante of FDR. Lunch will be at the Rhinecliff Hotel before caravanning to Staasburgh State Historic Site for a Downton Abbey themed tour of the Mills estate. The renowned architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White designed this Beaux Arts mansion for Ogden and Ruth Livingston Mills on a grassy hill overlooking the Hudson.

The fee for this tour is $790 per person for double occupancy; for single occupancy please add $150. This includes two dinners, two breakfasts and two lunches, overnight accommodations, tax and gratuity, and admission to all sites. You’ll also receive a copy of Historic Houses of the Hudson River Valley by Gregory Long.

Note: Fee does not include alcoholic beverages. Also, this tour requires walking and standing for extended periods of time, and many of the sites are not handicapped accessible.

 photo: Clinton County Historical Association

photo: Clinton County Historical Association

Inside Dannemora Prison I
Wednesday, July 2, 2014
Registration deadline: June 4

The Clinton Correctional Facility at Dannemora, originally built in 1845, is the third oldest in New York State. This unique opportunity will take us inside this maximum-security prison where we will visit a cellblock modeled on the “Auburn System,” the Church of the Good Thief built entirely by inmates, the North Yard, workshops, and the former Dannemora State Hospital. The history of the prison is fascinating and its architecture most dramatic. The day will begin with a walking tour of the village followed by a visit inside the prison in the afternoon. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH members and $45 for non-members. Participants must be 18 or older. For safety purposes, other restrictions apply. Please contact AARCH for information.

There will be another Dannemora tour on August 27.
Note: Cancellations made after June 4 cannot be refunded.

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Preserving Camp Santanoni
Four tours will be offered in 2014:
June 28, July 25, August 16 & September 5

Santanoni was built for Robert and Anna Pruyn of Albany beginning in 1892. The estate eventually included 12,900 acres and nearly four-dozen buildings. This tour will be led by AARCH director Steven Engelhart or former intern Nina Caruso. The day will include stops at the Gate Lodge, the 200-acre farm, and the Main Camp on Newcomb Lake where we’ll see ongoing restoration and learn about the conservation planning and restoration work. The Santanoni Preserve is owned by New York State, on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a National Historic Landmark. AARCH has long been associated with the protection, interpretation and restoration of this regional treasure.

The round-trip walk is 9.8 miles on a gently sloping carriage road. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. There is a suggested donation of $20. A limited number of seats are available on a horse-drawn wagon for a $25 fee. If you are handicapped, please let us know when you register so that we can have the proper wagon ready.

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RUSTIC ARCHITECTURE
Rustic Architecture of Big Moose
Tuesday, July 8, 2014

This tour will look at the distinctive rustic architecture of Big Moose Lake, including the work of Henry Covey, his son Earl, and the Martin family. The tour will include visits to the Big Moose Community Chapel and Manse, The Waldheim, Covewood Lodge, and Brown Gables. What makes many of these buildings unusual is their vertical half-log construction, a response to not having had a saw mill available. The tour, led by AARCH’s Steven Engelhart, begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $40 for members and $50 for non-members.

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Downtown Glens Falls
Thursday, July 10, 2014

Incorporated as a village in 1839, Glens Falls was granted its city charter on March 13, 1908. Growing as an industrial center, it relied heavily on the Hudson River to support its mills. Mark Frost of The Chronicle will lead a walking and driving tour of the downtown area. We will explore the city’s industrial, economic, and architectural history over the past 140 years including the William McEchron House which dates from 1891 and has new ownership and renovation plans. Other topics include the Finch, Pruyn and Company paper mill, buildings associated with lumber baron Henry Crandall, the former Clark Brothers glove factory, the Feeder Canal, and more. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $30 for AARCH members and $40 for non-members. FULL

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IRON MINING HISTORY
Tahawus and the Deserted Village of Adirondac
Friday, July 11, 2014

 On a remote road outside Newcomb stand an odd assortment of structures: an imposing stone tower, a stabilized 19th-century house, and a handful of tumbledown cottages, all on property owned by the Open Space Institute. On this tour we’ll look at more than a century of mining and we will see the 1854 McIntyre Furnace and the remains of the village of Adirondac. We’ll also talk about the Adirondack Iron and Steel Company operations, and the 20th-century mining operation at Tahawus. The McIntyre Furnace is an important early industrial site that has been documented by the Historic American Engineering Record. The last stop is the Masten House, built as part of the Tahawus Club and now being restored by SUNY ESF. The tour is led by NYS Archeologist Dave Staley; NYS DEC Historic Preservation Officer Chuck Vandrei; and Paul Hai, Program Coordinator at SUNY ESF’s Adirondack Ecological Center in Newcomb. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

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Small Farm Rising
Monday, July 14, 2014

In this outing we will explore a number of small farms and farm producers who are part of a new wave of farming in the Champlain Valley. This wave is made up of young farmers dedicated to producing the best possible, locally produced organic vegetables, meats, dairy products, and other farm-based products. We will visit a group of these farms and enterprises on the Mace Chasm Road near Keeseville and meet the people who run them. Stops will include Fledging Crow Vegetables, Mace Chasm Farm (meats and vegetables), Ausable Brewing Company (beer), the Manzini Farm (sheep), and the North Country Creamery (milk, yogurt, and cheese). Although this outing is mainly about the resurgence of small niche farming in the area, many of these operations are located on historic farmsteads. We’ll also enjoy a lunch made from their farm products. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. The fee is $45 for members and $55 for non-members. Lunch is included.

 photo: Constable Hall website

photo: Constable Hall website

NEW!
Lowville
Thursday, July 17, 2014

We begin with a tour of Constable Hall, a limestone, Federal style building dating to the early 1800s that was home to the Constable family for five generations. Lunch will be provided at the Chamber of Commerce, formerly the Bateman Hotel. In the afternoon we’ll embark on a walking tour of downtown Lowville with several interior stops illustrating a range of architectural styles. Our guides for the day will be Lowville historian Charlotte Beagle and Anne Merrill from the Chamber of Commerce. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $40 for AARCH members and $50 for non-members. Lunch is included.

Following the tour we encourage you to take advantage of free admission to the 194th Lewis County Fair, located in Lowville.

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photo: Pok-O-MacCready website

NEW!
Children’s Camps of Keeseville and Willsboro
Monday, July 21, 2014

Rooted in the progressive movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, children’s summer camps reached their peak of development in the 1920s and 30s. Whether promoting equal opportunity for girls, experiential learning opportunities in an outdoor setting, or serving as recreational boarding schools, these camps were often a child’s first introduction to the world of nature and outdoor recreation. This tour will explore the architecture, history and present operation of two long running children’s camps, both privately owned and operated by the same families since they were established. We will visit North Country Camps: Lincoln and Whippoorwill, celebrating their 95th season under the continuous direction of the Gucker family; and Camp Pok-O-MacCready, which has been welcoming campers since 1905 under guidance of the Swan family.

The tour will be led by Hallie Bond, curator of the Adirondack Museum’s 2003 exhibit, “A Paradise for Boys and Girls: Children’s Camps in the Adirondacks,” and co-author of the book of the same title. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $45 for members and $55 for non-members. Lunch is included. FULL

 photo: Camp Arden website

photo: Camp Arden website

SPONSORS ONLY
Camp Arden
Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The site of our 2012 mystery tour, Camp Arden, located near Onchiota, was so popular that we brought it back. Begun as little more than a collection of platform tents in the 1880s, the camp originally served as an escape from the rapid spread of tuberculosis. As more permanent structures took hold, it remained closely connected with TB, first as a place for recovery and treatment, and later when it was donated to the Trudeau Institute. Years of neglect left the site buried in overgrown trees, but the current owners persevered and have spent the last 16 years rebuilding, restoring and adding on to create Camp Arden. The tour begins at 9 a.m. and ends at noon. The fee is $35 and you must be a Sponsor level member ($100) or higher to attend.

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Croghan: Maple, Milling and Mennonites
Saturday, July 26, 2014

This western Adirondack border community, set along the Black River Trail in Lewis County, may be best known for its bologna, but it has much more to offer. Settled by War of 1812 hero General George Croghan, the town grew around the lumber and tanning industries, both of which harnessed the river for power. Today it is home to a variety of businesses and cultural sites. Stops on this tour include the Croghan Island Mill Lumber Company, one of the state’s last water powered saw mills in operation; the restored Croghan Railroad Depot and museum; St. Stephen’s Catholic Church; the American Maple Museum and Hall of Fame to learn about an important regional industry; and the Mennonite Heritage Farm. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members.

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Summer Living in Speculator
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

During the 20th century, Speculator, and the surrounding town of Lake Pleasant, grew as a year-round tourist destination. This tour will visit five properties around Lake Pleasant that represent the culture of second homes from this period. They vary in style, history, and use, and include Bearhurst, featured in Ann Stillman O’Leary’s Adirondack Style; Northwoods Lodge (circa 1939), which has remained in the same family since its construction; Cub’s Cove; Kiamesha; and Derloch. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. FULL

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Spiritual Retreats on Lake George
Thursday, July 31, 2014

 Join us on the eastern shore of Lake George as we visit the Wiawaka Holiday House, Paulist Fathers at St. Mary’s of the Lake, Mountainside Library, and Cleverdale Lakeside Chapel. Wiawaka was established in 1903 by founder Mary Wiltse Fuller as a retreat for women factory workers. It includes the 1870s Fuller House, once part of the Crosbyside Hotel. Built in the 1860s, St. Mary’s stands prominently on a hillside overlooking the lake. We will visit the chapel, dining hall, and dormitory. Mountainside Library (1904) was funded by local support as well as by a contribution from Andrew Carnegie. Entering their 92nd year of service, Cleverdale Chapel is a small, well-preserved church that operates seasonally. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and Wiawaka members and $45 for non-members.

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The Legacy of William and Alice Miner
Tuesday, August 5, 2014

 William Miner grew up in rural Chazy and made his fortune by inventing, patenting, and manufacturing railroad equipment. In 1903 he and his wife, Alice, returned to the family’s Chazy farm and began more than three decades of innovative philanthropic work in the region. In this outing we will explore two of the Miners’ most significant and lasting achievements – the Alice T. Miner Colonial Museum and Heart’s Delight Farm.

The museum was established in 1924 in a three-story stone mansion, built to house Alice’s collection of art and decorative objects. The farm was an organizational and technological marvel in its day with 300 buildings on 15,000 acres and 800 employees. In the 20th century the farm evolved into the Miner Institute, which focuses on pioneering agricultural research and livestock breeding. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH members $45 for non-members.

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Wanakena
Thursday, August 7, 2014

 The village of Wanakena was established in 1902 by the Rich Lumber Company on 16,000 acres on the southwest side of Cranberry Lake. When the company left Wanakena for Vermont in 1912, rather than dismantling the workers’ houses, they were sold to residents and tourists as summer residences. Historian Bill Gleason, and Allen Ditch will lead us on a walking tour of the company town.

We will enjoy a barbeque lunch at the Pinecone Restaurant’s lakeside pavilion and then visit the New York Ranger School, which has offered a forestry program since 1912. The day will conclude with a visit to Knollwood, designed and built by Dr. Frederick R. Calkins in 1915 as a complex of three summer camp buildings and a pedestrian suspension bridge over the Oswegatchie River. It was recently listed to the National Register of Historic Places. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $45 for members and $55 for non-members. Lunch is included. Total walking distance is about 1.5 miles. A limited number of seats are available on golf carts. If you have trouble walking and would like a ride, please note that when you register.

 photo: Kent-Delord House

photo: Kent-Delord House

NEW!
Plattsburgh
Saturday, August 9, 2014

Take a walk through historic Plattsburgh with Don Wickman, director of the Kent-Delord House museum. This tour will examine residential and commercial structures from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries in the downtown area, ending with a tour of the 1797 Kent-Delord house. This region contains representatives of most of the major architectural styles for these time periods, plus a few unique landmarks that help to make the city special. For lunch you have the option to bring your own or take advantage of the many downtown restaurants. The Plattsburgh Farmers’ Market will also be open, featuring dozens of local vendors. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members. Total walking distance is about 2 miles.

lyon14Lyon Mountain
Tuesday, August 12, 2014

 Once referred to as “the town that refused to die,” Lyon Mountain has faced overwhelming hurdles in the past half century. The open pit mining at Lyon Mountain was known for producing high quality iron ore, so preferred that it was used in the manufacture of the cables of the Golden Gate Bridge. The departure of Republic Steel in 1967 stripped the community of its largest employer. Despite this, the town has marched forth, celebrating its history through a mining museum, located in the restored 1903 Delaware and Hudson train station. This tour will include a visit to the museum, as well as a walking tour of the town. Many of the company homes, sold into private ownership years ago, have been restored. We’ll also look at the remains of the mining operation. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $30 for AARCH and $40 for non-members.

 photo: Moriah website

photo: Moriah website

NEW!
Port Henry: Then and Now
Friday, August 15, 2014

In the late 19th century, Port Henry was one of the wealthiest villages in New York. With iron mining wealth, the Witherbee & Sherman Company and its founders built new schools, churches, parks, libraries, and other institutions-many of which were designed by noted New York architects. The village is a museum of architectural styles ranging from Second Empire to Craftsman. Starting at the Sherman Free Library, designed by architect S. Gifford Slocum of Saratoga Springs, we will tour Port Henry’s churches and commercial buildings For lunch you have the option to dine at Foote’s Port Henry Diner-one of the oldest in the country. Besides historic buildings, Port Henry is also home to a vibrant public art program; and we will visit several new murals and signs that animate the village. Our tour will culminate with refreshments at the Made in the Mountains Gallery-housed in an elegant balconied commercial building.

Guides will be Frank Martin, a landscape and architectural historian, and Linda Smyth, a local artist. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 pm. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members. FULL

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Raquette Lake’s Long Point And Environs
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

This boat and walking tour will include visits to Camp Pine Knot, St. William’s on Long Point, and portions of The Antlers. William West Durant built Pine Knot beginning in the late 1870s and it was here that he first developed the features and details we now associate with Adirondack rustic architecture. The camp was later owned by railroad magnate, Collis P. Huntington. Saratoga Springs architect R. Newton Brezee, a friend of Durant’s, designed The Antlers in 1886. It originally operated as a hotel and cottage resort. Durant was also responsible for building Catholic St. William’s in 1890 to provide services for his employees. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m., includes a one-mile walk along a wooded trail, and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $45 for members and $55 for non-members.

 photo: LCMM website

photo: LCMM website

Lake Champlain Maritime History
Thursday, August 21, 2014

AARCH is proud to partner with the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes, Vermont to offer this tour that explores the hidden treasures and maritime history of Lake Champlain. Over 300 historic shipwrecks lie on the bottom of the lake and thanks to modern technology we’re able to view some of them through a submersible Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) whose camera provides an up-close view through an on-board monitor. Traveling by boat, we’ll hear the story of the Champlain II, a passenger steamboat that ran aground and sunk just north of Westport in 1875, and see the wreck through the ROV camera. After lunch at the Basin Harbor Club we’ll tour the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum to learn more about this lake that some consider the most historic body of water in North America. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $50 for AARCH and LCMM members and $60 for non-members. Lunch is included.

 photo: Sandra Weber

photo: Sandra Weber

CANCELLED!
The Milhollands of Lewis
Friday, August 22, 2014

Atop a hill in the town of Lewis rests the grave of a martyr of the American woman’s suffrage movement. Inez Milholland shot to fame as the herald atop a white horse at the head of the March 3, 1913 suffrage procession in Washington, DC. She set out as “the flying envoy” of the National Woman’s Party on a cross-country campaign for support of a federal suffrage amendment. The schedule sapped Inez of her vitality and she collapsed after demanding: “Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?” Inez died a few weeks later, at the age of 30. Her sacrifice was honored in the first memorial service ever held in the U.S. Capitol for a woman. Inez was a record-holding athlete at Vassar College, lawyer, journalist, member of the NAACP, pacifist, and fierce suffragist. Despite being eulogized by poets Carl Sandberg and Edna St. Vincent Millay, Inez sits quietly waiting for someone to “Take up the song, Forget the epitaph.” Stops on this tour will include Meadowmount School of Music, the Milholland estate; site of the 1924 “Forward Into Light” pageant, which attracted 10,000 visitors; Milholland Park; Lewis Congregational Church; and the graves of Inez and other Milhollands.

These sites will be interpreted by Sandra Weber, Elizabethtown/Lewis author, historian, storyteller, and Inez scholar and re-enactor. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH members and $45 for non-members.

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Damming of the Sacandaga
Saturday, August 23, 2014

 Beginning in the early 19th century the area along the Sacandaga River was being developed by lumbering interests, taking advantage of the abundance of pine, ash and oak. By the late 1800s tourism and recreation had become a large part of the economy with the opening of Sacandaga Park, and visitor numbers rose with the extension of the Fonda, Johnstown and Gloversville railroad into Northville. Living on a powerful river with a large watershed came with a price- near annual flooding. This caused millions of dollars in property damage downstream along the Hudson River. Damming the Sacandaga and converting the Sacandaga Valley into a reservoir would allow for better control of water flow of the Hudson. Though the building of the dam and the creation of the Sacandaga Reservoir has been well worth the investment, in the process 1,100 people were relocated and many acres of prime farmland were lost, as were numerous structures and bridges that weren’t moved.

Local resident and AARCH board member Willem Monster will tell the story of Sacandaga Park and the resort community that once was, and how the valley came to be hidden beneath the Great Sacandaga Lake. Stops will include the restored FJ&G train station, a walk through Sacandaga Park and a boat ride to Fish House. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH members and $45 for non-members.

 photo: Clinton County Historical Association

photo: Clinton County Historical Association

Inside Dannemora Prison II
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Registration deadline: July 30

The Clinton Correctional Facility at Dannemora, originally built in 1845, is the third oldest in New York State. This unique opportunity will take us inside this maximum-security prison where we will visit a cellblock modeled on the “Auburn System,” the Church of the Good Thief built entirely by inmates, the North Yard, workshops, and the former Dannemora State Hospital. The history of the prison is fascinating and its architecture most dramatic. The day will begin with a walking tour of the village followed by a visit inside the prison in the afternoon. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and $45 for non-members. Participants must be 18 or older. For safety purposes, other restrictions apply. Please contact AARCH for information.

Note: Cancellations made after July 30 cannot be refunded.

 photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise

photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Bartlett’s Carry Club
Thursday, August 28, 2014

At Bartlett’s Carry, the Saranac River drops thirty feet in two tenths of a mile between Upper Saranac Lake and Middle Saranac Lake, making a portage in both directions necessary. This stretch of river was also legendary for its trout fishing. It was here in 1854 that Virgil Bartlett established an inn for 50 guests and a horse-drawn wagon service for conveying boats along the carry. For thirty five years he and his wife, Caroline, operated this popular establishment. The property was then purchased by a group of wealthy patrons who organized it as The Saranac Club and built additional lodges and private cottages. During the 20th century it was used in a variety of ways and, in 1968, it was purchased by Fran and Jay Yardley, who restored and opened it to the public as the Bartlett’s Carry Club. It was later sold into private, cooperative ownership.

This is a rare opportunity to visit a place of great regional historical importance and to hear its story from Fran Yardley, Bartlett’s Carry historian, actor, and storyteller. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members. FULL

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Valcour Island II
Monday, September 8, 2014

 The waters surrounding Valcour Island in Lake Champlain were the scene of the Battle of Valcour, an important naval battle during the Revolutionary War. Here in October 1776, a small colonial fleet under the command of Benedict Arnold engaged the British fleet. During the 19th century, the island was briefly home to a fledgling “free-love” colony and, in 1874, a lighthouse was built on it. The island is now part of the Forest Preserve and the lighthouse is being restored by the Clinton County Historical Association. We will travel by boat to Valcour Island for a four-mile interpretive hike with AARCH’s Steven Engelhart and naturalist David Thomas-Train. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $40 for AARCH and CCHA members and $50 for non-members.

 photos: Shelburne Farms and Shelburne Museum

photos: Shelburne Farms and Shelburne Museum

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND
Beyond the Blue Line: The Webbs of Shelburne
Wednesday and Thursday, September 10 and 11
Registration deadline: August 12

Experience rich history, breathtaking views, dynamic architecture and a world class museum on this Beyond the Blue Line tour in Shelburne, Vermont. Here we’ll be taken back in time to 1886 to the story of William Seward Webb and Lila Vanderbilt Webb and their creation of Shelburne Farms, a model agricultural estate. We’ll also explore Shelburne Museum, which was established by William and Lila’s daughter-in-law, Electra Havemeyer Webb, and includes a vast and unique array of collections.

shelburne142The Webbs acquired a swath of land along Lake Champlain, then employed two of the era’s most prominent designers to bring their dream to life. The grounds were the work of Frederick Law Olmsted, while the buildings were handled by Robert H. Robertson, who also designed the Webbs’ Nehasane Lodge on Lake Lila, as well as the main lodge at Camp Santanoni. At its peak the farm encompassed 3,800 acres, had 300 employees, a huge range of farm products, and a hackney breeding operation. Today, the 1,400-acre farm, and National Historic Landmark, still operates under the guidance of the Webb family, with a mission “to cultivate a conservation ethic for a sustainable future.” On day one of the tour, participants will tour the farm’s grounds and buildings, get a peek at the archives, and learn about the ongoing garden restoration. Accommodations, dinner and breakfast will be at the luxurious Inn, formerly William and Lila’s family home.

On the second day we’ll visit the Brick House, which was the home of William and Lila’s oldest son James Watson and his wife, Electra Havemeyer, from 1913-1960. The house was part of one of the smaller farms that grew into Shelburne Farms, but was extensively remodeled and expanded by James and Electra. The grand 40-room Colonial Revival also acted as an early display platform for Electra’s growing collections of art and Americana, which would eventually be housed at the Shelburne Museum, where we’ll spend the rest of the day. Electra founded the Shelburne Museum in 1947 with a goal of creating “an educational project, varied and alive.” She amassed multiple historic houses, a lighthouse, and even a steamboat to use as interactive exhibits and space to display collections. Today, 39 buildings house over 150,000 objects ranging from carriages, to Impressionist paintings, to blown glass canes.

The fee for this tour is $390 per person for double occupancy, which includes three meals, overnight accommodations at the Inn, tax and gratuity, and admission to all sites. For single occupancy please add $100. Note: Fee does not include alcoholic beverages.

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SPACES STILL AVAILABLE
Saranac Lake: Pioneer Health Resort
Friday, September 12, 2014

Co-sponsored by Historic Saranac Lake, this tour will be led by Amy Catania, HSL Executive Director. View many of the buildings, and sites that made Saranac Lake America’s “Pioneer Health Resort.” The village’s late 19th- and early 20th-century history is closely tied to the treatment for tuberculosis developed by Dr. Edward L. Trudeau. The tour will include the Trudeau Institute, where we will see Little Red, the first cure cottage; the former Trudeau Sanatorium; Saranac Laboratory; the Cure Cottage Museum; and the Béla Bartók Cottage. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. Be prepared for uphill walking. The fee is $40 for AARCH and HSL members and $50 for non-members. Tour attendees will also receive a copy of Cure Cottages of Saranac Lake by Philip L. Gallos.

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photo: Times of Ti

RARE OPPORTUNITY
Fort Ticonderoga: Behind the Scenes
Thursday, September 18, 2014

We are partnering with Fort Ticonderoga to present this exclusive opportunity to experience the Fort like you’ve never seen it before. This tour will offer a rare look inside the building where the preservation of Fort Ticonderoga began and learn about the exciting new research that is challenging long-held assumptions about the building’s past. Considered one of the first preservation efforts in America, Fort Ticonderoga is the story of strategic military significance in the 18th century, landmark preservation and tourism in the 19th century, and monumental restoration in the 20th century. You’ll see remarkably preserved evidence of the Fort’s original structures and catch a glimpse at some of the systems that keep the Fort running today. We’ll also visit the Thompson-Pell Research Center and view documents and photos pertaining to the history of the Fort and Pavilion.

Guides for the day will be Beth Hill, President and CEO, and Christopher Fox, Curator of Collections. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $55 for AARCH members $65 for non-members. Lunch is included.

slate

Slate Valley
Friday, September 19, 2014

 Running approximately 24 miles along the border between New York and Vermont, the Slate Valley has been a source of slate since 1848 and is the only place in the world where such a wide variety of slate colors can be found. Over the past 160 years, this industry, which relied heavily on immigrant labor, has seen success, downturn, and finally a resurgence that continues to the present. On this tour we will explore the history and process of slate quarrying at the Slate Valley Museum. Then we’ll look at examples of the way slate is used during a walking tour of Granville. Finally we’ll visit Newmont Slate Company, one of the nearly 30 quarries in operation today to see first hand how the stone is processed into roofing slate. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members.