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We appreciated having the opportunity to visit so many places not generally open for public viewing. It makes us appreciate the beauty of the Adirondacks, its history and its people. You and your staff have done a fine job with this program.
Jim and Nancy McAllister, 2004
Thank you for a terrific tour of the Speculator camps yesterday.
Doug Wilson, 2010
Maureen and I want to thank you for arranging and guiding the North Pole and Land of Makebelieve tours last Saturday. We're looking forward to many more tours of places that made the Adirondacks such a vibrant place to grow up in. AARCH is performing a wonderful job to make that possible for us and future generations!
Terry Barber, 2010
Every tour would be very interesting if one could spare the time. Thank you for the fine accomplishments and great tours.
Terry and George Cataldo, 2007
Visiting Kenjockety is definitely going to be one of the most outstanding memories of so many memorable AARCH tours.
Sally Berk, 2011
Enjoyed today's tours very much. AARCH tours are always one of the highlights of my summers and this was a fitting way to bring my summer activity schedule to a close.
Barbara Kolapakka, 2011
We wanted to let you know that we thoroughly enjoyed the Holland Patent tour. You put together a very interesting morning and afternoon...We learned a lot about the very pretty town that we had passed through so many times.
Al and Mary Ellen Price, 2011
The whole tour
[Beyond the Blue Line: Exploring the 1000 Islands] certainly lived up to our expectations...We wouldn't have changed a thing - unless you could have managed to add a few more hours in the days. It all went too quickly.
Joe and Susan Telfer, 2011
AARCH Tours
Our 2013 Tour Season has come to a close.
Please check back late Spring for the 2014 Tour Schedule.

Browse through our 2013 Tours, listed below. Next year's schedule will offer most of these tours again with some new additions.

NEW!
Bartlett's Carry Club
Saturday, June 8, 2013
photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise

At Bartlett's Carry, the Saranac River drops thirty feet in two tenths of a mile between Upper Saranac Lake and Middle Saranac Lake, making a portage in both directions necessary. This stretch of river was also legendary for its trout fishing. It was here in 1854 that Virgil Bartlett established an inn for 50 guests and a horse-drawn wagon service for conveying boats along the carry. For thirty five years he and his wife, Caroline, operated this popular establishment. The property was then purchased by a group of wealthy patrons who organized it as The Saranac Club and built additional lodges and private cottages. During the 20th century it was used in a variety of ways and, in 1968, it was purchased by Fran and Jay Yardley, who restored and opened it to the public as the Bartlett's Carry Club. It was later sold into private, cooperative ownership.

This is a rare opportunity to visit a place of great regional historical importance and to hear its story from Fran Yardley, Bartlett's Carry historian, actor, and storyteller. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 12:30 p.m. The fee is $25 for members and $35 for non-members.

Valcour Island I
Monday, June 17, 2013

The waters surrounding Valcour Island in Lake Champlain were the scene of the Battle of Valcour, an important naval battle during the Revolutionary War. Here in October 1776, a small colonial fleet under the command of Benedict Arnold engaged the British fleet. During the 19th century, the island was briefly home to a fledgling "free-love" colony and, in 1874, a lighthouse was built on it. The island is now part of the Forest Preserve and the lighthouse is being restored by the Clinton County Historical Association. We will travel by boat to the island for a four-mile interpretive hike with AARCHs Steven Engelhart and naturalist David Thomas-Train. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. Suggested donation is $40 for AARCH and CCHA members and $50 for non-members.
There will be a second tour on September 6.

Beyond the Blue Line: Exploring the Thousand Islands
Thursday, June 20 - Friday, June 21, 2013
Registration deadline: May 30

Returning due to popular demand, this is a two-day tour of the Thousand Islands, located in the St. Lawrence Seaway, along New Yorks northern border. Known during the Gilded Age for grand island castles and fast boats, it was the destination for many of societys most well-known and influential families.

The tour will begin with an afternoon walking tour of Thousand Island Park on Wellesley Island, led by architect Robert Charron. This will be followed by dinner at the historic Wellesley Hotel. The cottage community of Thousand Island Park is one of the most intact remnants of the turn-of-the-century summer lifestyle that defined the region.

Friday will include a guided tour of the Antique Boat Museum, set on 4.5 acres of riverfront in Clayton; a boat tour of the river; and a visit to the famed Boldt Castle on Heart Island, built by George Boldt, proprietor of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Construction ceased following the death of Georges wife in 1904 and the unfinished castle sat idle for 73 years before a multi-million dollar restoration was begun by its current owners, the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority.

The fee for the tour is $300 per person for double occupancy. Single occupancy is an additional $85. This includes an overnight stay at the Riveredge Resort in downtown Alexandria Bay, three meals, gratuity, and admission to all sites. Alcoholic beverages are not included.

NEW!
Architecture of Andrew Chary
Monday, June 24, 2013
photo: Andrew Chary

Our architectural heritage is in constant flux, with buildings being built and demolished on a daily basis. Over the years weve featured the work of several contemporary architects, exploring how they have been influenced by historic structures as well as popular trends. Andrew Chary has over 27 years experience as an architect and brings to the field a desire to create "Heirloom Architecture", thoughtful, timeless designs that will endure many generations. This tour will explore a sample of Andrews work in Lake Placid where well learn about how intimacy can be created within a residential area and how quality craftsmanship defines the atmosphere of a home. Well also see Japanese influence used to create an "Adirondack Zen". The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $30 and is open to Sponsor level members only.

Inside Dannemora Prison I
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Registration deadline: May 28

The Clinton Correctional Facility at Dannemora, originally built in 1845, is the third oldest in New York State. This unique opportunity will take us inside this maximum-security prison where we will visit a cellblock modeled on the "Auburn System", the Church of the Good Thief built entirely by inmates, the North Yard, workshops, and the former Dannemora State Hospital. The history of the prison is fascinating and its architecture most dramatic. The tour begins at 9 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and CCHA members and $45 for non-members.

Participants must be 18 or older. For safety purposes other restrictions apply, please contact AARCH for information. Note: Cancellations made after May 28 cannot be refunded.
There will be another tour on August 28.

Preserving Camp Santanoni I
Friday, June 28, 2013

Santanoni was built for Robert and Anna Pruyn of Albany beginning in 1892. The estate eventually included 12,900 acres and nearly four-dozen buildings. This tour will be led by AARCH director Steven Engelhart and 2012 intern Charlotte Barrett, and will feature the launch of the new guide to Santanoni, authored by Barrett. The day will include stops at the Gate Lodge, the 200-acre farm, and the Main Camp on Newcomb Lake where well see ongoing restoration and learn about the conservation planning and restoration work. The Santanoni Preserve is owned by New York State, on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a National Historic Landmark. AARCH has long been associated with the protection, interpretation and restoration of this regional treasure.

The round-trip walk is 9.8 miles on a gently sloping carriage road. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. Suggested donation is $20 for AARCH members and $30 for non-members. A limited number of seats are available on a horse-drawn wagon for an additional $20 fee.
There will be another tour on September 7.

Rustic Architecture of Big Moose
Tuesday, July 2, 2013

This tour will look at the distinctive rustic architecture of Big Moose Lake, including the work of Henry Covey, his son Earl, and the Martin family. The tour will include visits to the Big Moose Community Chapel and Manse, The Waldheim, Covewood Lodge, and Brown Gables. What makes many of these buildings unusual is their vertical half-log construction, a response to not having had a saw mill available. The tour, led by AARCHs Steven Engelhart, begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $40 for members and $50 for non-members.

Croghan: Maple, Milling and Mennonites
Saturday, July 6, 2013

This western Adirondack border community in Lewis County may be best known for its bologna, but it has much more to offer. Stops on this tour include the Croghan Island Mill Lumber Company, one of the states last water powered saw mills in operation; the American Maple Museum and Hall of Fame to learn about an important regional industry; the restored Croghan Railroad Depot and museum; and the Mennonite Heritage Farm to experience Zwanzigstein, known as Z-Fest. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members.

NEW!
Children's Camps of Long Lake
Tuesday, July 9, 2013
photo: Sabattis Adventure Camp website

Rooted in the progressive movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, childrens summer camps reached their peak of development in the 1920s and 30s. Whether promoting equal opportunity for girls, experiential learning opportunities in an outdoor setting, or serving as recreational boarding schools, these camps were often a childs first introduction to the world of nature and outdoor recreation. This tour will explore the architecture, history and present operation of two long running childrens camps, in operation since 1969 and 1959 respectively. We will visit Long Lake Camp for the Arts, specializing in fine and performing arts; and Sabattis Adventure Camp, part of the Boy Scouts of America.

The tour will be led by Hallie Bond, curator of the Adirondack Museums 2003 exhibit, "A Paradise for Boys and Girls: Childrens Camps in the Adirondacks", and co-author of the book of the same title. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. Lunch is included.

Tahawus and the Deserted Village of Adirondac
Thursday, July 11, 2013

On a remote road outside Newcomb stand an odd assortment of structures: an imposing stone tower, a stabilized 19th-century house, and a handful of tumbledown cottages, all on property owned by the Open Space Institute. On this tour well look at more than a century of mining and we will see the 1854 McIntyre Furnace and the remains of the village of Adirondac, and talk about the Adirondack Iron and Steel Company operations, and the 20th-century mining operation at Tahawus. The McIntyre Furnace is an important early industrial site that has been documented by the Historic American Engineering Record. The tour is led by NYS Archeologist Dave Staley; NYS DEC Historic Preservation Officer Chuck Vandrei; and Paul Hai, Program Coordinator at SUNY ESFs Adirondack Ecological Center in Newcomb. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

Mt. McGregor
Friday, July 12, 2013
photo: Historic postcard - J. Scott Sawyer

Mt. McGregor is the home to two very different and unusual sitesthe General Ulysses S. Grant Cottage and Mt. McGregor Correctional Facility. The former is the cottage where General Grant spent his final months completing his memoirs before succumbing to throat cancer in 1885. Just over the fence is a compound of buildings that sprawls along the mountaintop and was constructed in 1912 as a tuberculosis hospital by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to care for its afflicted employees. This institutional campus is comprised largely of Arts and Crafts influenced buildings, but its gem is a Mission style chapel containing a recently discovered altar painting by early 20th century artist Elliot Dangerfield. By the 1940s the hospital had become a veterans camp, and then a center for people with developmental disabilities. After a period of vacancy the site reopened in 1976 as a medium security prison and continues to operate as such today. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and Wilton Heritage Society members and $45 for non-members.

Keene Valley
Tuesday, July 16, 2013

The Town of Keene, occupying a fertile, mountainous stretch along the Ausable River valley, has long been a place for farming, industrial endeavors and recreational pastimes. Beginning on the southern end of the valley in St. Huberts well visit Putnam Camp, possibly the earliest and longest operating club in the Adirondacks. We will then work our way north, stopping at private homes and camps that illustrate the valleys history, ending at the home of regional architect Nils Luderowski. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members. TOUR FILLED

Slate Valley
Thursday, July 18, 2013

Running approximately 24 miles along the border between New York and Vermont, the Slate Valley has been a source of slate since 1848 and is the only place in the world where such a wide variety of slate colors can be found. Over the past 160 years, this industry, which relied heavily on immigrant labor, has seen success, downturn, and finally a resurgence that continues to the present. On this tour we will explore the history and process of slate quarrying at the Slate Valley Museum. Then well look at examples of the way slate is used during a walking tour of Granville. Finally well visit Newmont Slate Company, one of the nearly 30 quarries in operation today to see first hand how the stone is processed into roofing slate. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members.

NEW!
Mystery Tour
Monday, July 22, 2013

We have a new and exciting area to explore, but cant tell you where it is. We can say that its a place AARCH has never visited before and that youll surely be delighted. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members. TOUR FILLED

NEW!
Back to the Land
Thursday, July 25, 2013
photo: Earthwood School website

Though utilizing natural resources for home construction is not a new concept, some builders take it farther than others, maximizing the recycling potential of materials. There are many techniques, such as straw bale construction, cordwood construction, earth-sheltered housing or reuse of manufactured materials. This tour will take us to Murtagh Hill, a neighborhood in West Chazy where several families have embraced these methods and put them to use in building their homes. Murtagh Hill is also home to Earthwood Building School, run by Rob and Jaki Roy, and committed to teaching others about alternative building. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members.

NEW!
North River
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
photo: Big Shanty website

The hamlet of North River, located on the upper Hudson, was built on the garnet mining industry and today is the last remaining site of garnet mining in the state of New York. The first mine was begun by Henry Barton in 1878; stones were knocked loose by small hammers and hand picked. About 1892 Frank Hooper entered the scene, and with help from his brother, developed a mechanical process for separating the garnet, revolutionizing the industry. This tour will focus on the garnet mining history, visiting the first two mine locations, and will touch on other industries important to the communitys history. Well also stop at Christian Hill; historic residences including Big Shanty, the 1909 home of Mr. Hooper; and Garnet Hill Lodge for lunch. The tour, led by Milda Burns, a lifelong resident of North River, will begin at 10 a.m. and end around 3 p.m. The fee is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. Lunch is included. TOUR FILLED

The Lake Champlain Bridge and Environs: History, Architecture, and Engineering
Wednesday, July 31, 2013
photo: Eric A. Besette

The 1929 Champlain Bridge had long been an icon on Lake Champlain, gracefully arching up over the water, connecting New York and Vermont. The replacement bridge, opened in 2011, not only pays tribute to its predecessor but now makes a pedestrian connection between two of the richest historical sites in both states. On this tour well explore Chimney Point State Park in Vermont, Crown Point State Historic Site in New York, the Lake Champlain lighthouse, and the new bridge that ties them together. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and ECHS members, and $45 for non-members.

NEW!
Corinth
Friday, August 2, 2013
photo: Hudson River Mill Project website

Throughout the 19th century, river drives transported trees, cut in the mountains of the Adirondacks, down the Hudson River to waiting mills. The pulp, paper, and lumber industry defined the growth of river communities. The most prestigious site was located in Corinth - the International Paper Companys corporate headquarters, which operated there from 1905-2002. This tour will look at the technology and power used to process the logs to paper by visiting the remaining buildings at the IP plant, along with several sites up river towards Luzerne that will help illustrate the rivers milling history. Well learn about development of the pulp and paper industry at Palmer Falls that began in 1869 and discuss early hydroelectric power on the Hudson. The tour, led by history professor Stephen Cernek, begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

Raquette Lake's Long Point And Environs
Tuesday, August 6, 2013

This boat and walking tour will include visits to Camp Pine Knot, St. Williams on Long Point, and portions of The Antlers, a former hotel. William West Durant built Pine Knot beginning in the late 1870s and it was here that he first developed the features and details we now associate with Adirondack rustic architecture. The camp was later owned by railroad magnate, Collis P. Huntington. Saratoga Springs architect R. Newton Brezee, a friend of Durants, designed The Antlers in 1886. It originally operated as a hotel and cottage resort. Durant was also responsible for building Catholic St. Williams in 1890 to provide services for his employees. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m., includes a one-mile walk along a wooded trail, and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $45 for members and $55 for non-members.

NEW!
Small Farm Rising
Thursday, August 8, 2013

In this outing we will explore a number of small farms and farm producers who are part of a new wave of farming in the Champlain Valley. This wave is made up of young farmers dedicated to producing the best possible, locally produced organic vegetables, meats, dairy products, and other farm-based products. We will visit a group of these farms and enterprises on the Mace Chasm Road near Keeseville and meet the people who run them. Stops will include Fledging Crow Vegetables, Mace Chasm Farm (meats and vegetables), Ausable Brewing Company (beer), the Manzini Farm (sheep), and the North Country Creamery (milk, yogurt, and cheese). Although this outing is mainly about the resurgence of small niche farming in the area, many of these operations are located on historic farmsteads. Well also enjoy their products along the way. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

Huntington Camp Wildlife Forest
Friday, August 9, 2013
photo: SUNY-ESF website

Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington were passionate about the arts, nature, and animals, and were no strangers to altruism. Their philanthropy created or supported numerous parks, libraries, and museums. Their largest regional contribution came between 1932 and 1939 when they donated 15,000 acres surrounding their W.W. Durant-designed, Arbutus Lake estate in Newcomb, to Syracuse University to create the Huntington Wildlife Forest. The property was turned over to what is now the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry and is the site of its Adirondack Ecological Center. We will tour the camp, and learn about Durants original design, the Huntingtons, and the use by the college of the preserve for ecological research. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

Northville on Great Sacandaga Lake
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
photo: Willem Monster

Northville prospered in early years, due to the lumber industry and manufacturing enterprises, and commerce greatly increased when the FJ&G Railroad line from Gloversville opened in 1875. The railroad also built the Sacandaga Park resort, bringing thousands of visitors. Much changed in 1930 when most of the farms in the valley and parts of Sacandaga Park were flooded by the Sacandaga Reservoir, leading to a general economic decline of the region that continued on and off till the 1980s. For lack of economic "progress", much of the Northvilles beautiful and varied historic architecture remains. Recreation and tourism are now the main drivers of the Northville economy.

The tour, led by local resident and AARCH board member Willem Monster, will start with a presentation at the Northville Northampton Historical Museum, followed by a walking tour of interesting residential architecture. During lunch well be engaged in a presentation on Main Street revitalization issues. The tour will conclude with a walk through the historic cottage circle in Sacandaga Park. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

Wanakena
Friday, August 16, 2013

The village of Wanakena was established in 1902 by the Rich Lumber Company on 16,000 acres on the southwest side of Cranberry Lake. When the company left Wanakena for Vermont in 1912, rather than dismantling the workers houses, they were sold to residents and tourists as summer residences. Historian Bill Gleason, and Allen Ditch will lead us on a walking tour of the company town.

We will enjoy a barbeque lunch at the Pinecone Restaurants lakeside pavilion and then visit the New York Ranger School, which has offered a forestry program since 1912. The day will conclude with a visit to Knollwood, designed and built by Dr. Frederick R. Calkins in 1915 as a complex of three summer camp buildings and a pedestrian suspension bridge over the Oswegatchie River. It was recently listed to the National Register of Historic Places. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $45 for members and $55 for non-members. Lunch is included.

Painted Ladies of Malone
Saturday, August 17, 2013

As a gateway to the Adirondack region, the city of Malone prospered during the late 19th-century. People came to the area for the affordable land and made their fortunes growing hops and harvesting lumber. Steady wealth, in addition to access to the railroad, led to the construction of dozens of buildings representing the Victorian era of architecture. Wonderful examples of elaborately adorned and painted Queen Anne and Italianate homes line the streets, many meticulously maintained. The day will begin with a visit to the Franklin County Historical and Museum Society, to be followed by a walking tour of a historic neighborhood that will include several interiors. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and FCHMS members and $45 for non-members.

The Clarks of Willsboro Point: The Quarry
Wednesday, August 21, 2013

During the late 19th century Orrin Clark, and his sons Solomon and Lewis, operated a successful quarry on Ligonier Point in Willsboro, providing "bluestone" for a number of regional buildings, as well as the Champlain Canal and the Brooklyn Bridge. In addition to the quarry the Clarks ran a dairy farm and a shipbuilding business. This tour will focus on the business side of the Clark history, visiting the quarry remains; the Clarks old homestead, Old Elm; and the surrounding grounds. It will also include a slide show of historic photos to help illustrate the familys story. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 4 p.m. The fee is $35 for members and $45 for non-members.

NEW!
Million Dollar Dam
Thursday, August 22, 2013
photo: Miner Institute

William H. Miner is perhaps best known as the wealthy railroad industrialist who returned to his modest Chazy farm to construct a 15,000-acre farm in the early 20th century, but he also undertook numerous hydroelectric projects throughout the North Country. Located 8 miles from Miner Institute, the 6,800-acre sandstone pavement barren is known as the Altona Flat Rock. This unique ecosystem consists of a series of reservoirs and small streams that was once the site of one of Miner's hydroelectric projects. The focal point of the tour is the 2,300-foot long "Million Dollar" Dam. Constructed in 22 months by 500 workers, this engineering marvel held approximately 1 billion gallons of water and operated for seven years. The tour will include a walk to the crest of the dam to view its expanse, the cement road, and the "scarpit" reservoir. The dams 30-foot high rebar reinforced wall highlights the structures distinct contrast to the adjacent jack pine forest. A short trail walk to the remnants of the penstocks and powerhouse rounds out the day. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3p.m. The fee is $30 for members and $40 for non-members.

Lake Champlain Maritime History
Saturday, August 24, 2013
photo: LCMM website

AARCH is proud to partner with the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes, Vermont to offer this tour that explores the hidden treasures and maritime history of Lake Champlain. Over 300 historic shipwrecks lie on the bottom of the lake and thanks to modern technology were able to view some of them through a submersible Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) whose camera provides an up-close view through an on-board monitor. Traveling by boat, well hear the story of the Champlain II, a passenger steamboat that ran aground and sunk just north of Westport in 1875, and see the wreck through the ROV camera. Then well tour the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum to learn more about this lake that some consider the most historic body of water in North America. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $45 for AARCH and LCMM members and $55 for non-members. Lunch is included.

Inside Dannemora Prison II
Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Registration deadline: July 31

The Clinton Correctional Facility at Dannemora, originally built in 1845, is the third oldest in New York State. This unique opportunity will take us inside this maximum-security prison where we will visit a cellblock modeled on the "Auburn System", the Church of the Good Thief built entirely by inmates, the North Yard, workshops, and the former Dannemora State Hospital. The history of the prison is fascinating and its architecture most dramatic. The tour begins at 9 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. The fee is $35 for AARCH and CCHA members and $45 for non-members.

Participants must be 18 or older. For safety purposes other restrictions apply, please contact AARCH for information. Note: Cancellations made after July 31 cannot be refunded.

Valcour Island II
Friday, September 6, 2013

The waters surrounding Valcour Island in Lake Champlain were the scene of the Battle of Valcour, an important naval battle during the Revolutionary War. Here in October 1776, a small colonial fleet under the command of Benedict Arnold engaged the British fleet. During the 19th century, the island was briefly home to a fledgling "free-love" colony and, in 1874, a lighthouse was built on it. The island is now part of the Forest Preserve and the lighthouse is being restored by the Clinton County Historical Association. We will travel by boat to the island for a four-mile interpretive hike with AARCHs Steven Engelhart and naturalist David Thomas-Train. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends around 3:30 p.m. Suggested donation is $40 for AARCH and CCHA members and $50 for non-members.

Preserving Camp Santanoni II
Saturday, September 7, 2013

Santanoni was built for Robert and Anna Pruyn of Albany beginning in 1892. The estate eventually included 12,900 acres and nearly four-dozen buildings. This tour will be led by AARCH director Steven Engelhart and 2012 intern Charlotte Barrett, and will feature the launch of the new guide to Santanoni, authored by Barrett. The day will include stops at the Gate Lodge, the 200-acre farm, and the Main Camp on Newcomb Lake where well see ongoing restoration and learn about the conservation planning and restoration work. The Santanoni Preserve is owned by New York State, on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a National Historic Landmark. AARCH has long been associated with the protection, interpretation and restoration of this regional treasure.

The round-trip walk is 9.8 miles on a gently sloping carriage road. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. Suggested donation is $20 for AARCH members and $30 for non-members. A limited number of seats are available on a horse-drawn wagon for an additional $20 fee.

Saranac Lake: Pioneer Health Resort
Friday, September 13, 2013

Co-sponsored by Historic Saranac Lake, this tour will be led by Mary Hotaling, its former director. View many of the buildings, and sites that made Saranac Lake Americas "Pioneer Health Resort". The village's late 19th- and early 20th-century history is closely tied to the treatment for tuberculosis developed by Dr. Edward L. Trudeau. The tour will include the Trudeau Institute, where we will see Little Red, the first cure cottage; the former Trudeau Sanatorium; Saranac Laboratory; the Cure Cottage Museum; and the Bla Bartk Cottage. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and ends around 3 p.m. Be prepared for uphill walking. The fee is $35 for AARCH and HSL members and $45 for non-members. Tour attendees will also receive a copy of Cure Cottages of Saranac Lake by Philip L. Gallos.

NEW!
Beyond the Blue Line:
Rockwell Kent on Monhegan Island

Friday, September 20 - Sunday, September 22, 2013

For years we have explored the art, architecture, and life of Rockwell Kent in the Adirondacks through our Architecture of Rockwell Kent outing. But before Kent ever came to the Adirondacks and settled in at Asgaard Farm near Ausable Forks, he lived, painted, and designed buildings on Monhegan Island in Maine. Located ten miles off the coast, Monhegan is a magical place. It has a tiny picturesque village, a small fishing fleet, and its beautiful landscapes have attracted painters and other artists for more than a century, including Robert Henri, George Bellows, and three generations of the Wyeth family.

This outing will explore Monhegan and Kents architectural work, painting, and other legacies there. We will visit Kents cottage, studio, and the other buildings he designed or built there, guided by Robert Stahl, Chair of the James Fitzgerald Legacy, which owns the Kent cottage and studio. We will also explore the larger natural and cultural history of the island at the Monhegan Museum and will have time to walk the islands paths and to enjoy its forests, coastline, and vistas.

The fee is $790 per person for double occupancy. Please add $150 for single occupancy. Tour price includes boat transportation, two nights and six meals at the Island Inn, and museum fees. The Island Inn dates from 1910 and is a quintessential turn-of-the-century summer hotel - a three story, shingled-sided, mansard-roofed structure with extensive wraparound porches - overlooking Monhegan harbor. Alcoholic beverages are not included. Participants should be able to handle the rugged terrain of Monhegan and the considerable walking involved in this outing.

NEW!
Leary Castle
Saturday, September 28, 2013
photo: learycastle.blogspot.com

In a region rife with logs and clapboard, a cinder block castle is something of an anomaly. Begun in 1993 by retired probation officer, Ed Leary, the castle slowly took shape. Leary completed most of the work himself, with the help of a local stone mason. Leary passed away in 2005, never seeing his dream become reality. Skaneateles based architect Andy Ramsgard and his family purchased the property in 2009 and have spent the years since finishing construction. The final product features gargoyles on the roof and medieval furnishings, ensuring a sense of fantasy. There will be two tours lasting approximately two hours each. Please note whether you prefer the 10 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. tour. The fee is $20 for members and $30 for non-members.

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