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The Mid-Century Adirondack Vacation: Tours 2016

Posted on: May 13th, 2016 No Comments

“It is in the nature of the automobile that the city spreads out thus and far away,” said Frank Lloyd Wright. The automobile offered a tantalizing liberation for Americans in the early twentieth century—freedom to go wherever, whenever,  with a speed never thought possible. We take it for granted today, but remember the feeling when you first rode a bike or first learned to drive? Multiply that by 58 million — that’s how many cars were sold in the US in the 1950s. With the freedom to move faster and easier, downtown housing declined and cities began to stretch and spread out. >> More


Hands-On History: Places Matter

Posted on: March 21st, 2016 No Comments

By Steven Engelhart There are lots of ways to learn about and understand history. We read about history in books, magazines, and from original sources. We see history through the photographs of Matthew Brady or Seneca Ray Stoddard, paintings by Benjamin West or by poring over old maps. We hear the recollections of those who experienced war, depression, and other events great and small. But the most tangible access that we have to history is through our daily contact with historic buildings and places. When I walk across Keeseville’s Stone Arch Bridge, I am inspired by the work of Solomon >> More


Winter Weekend Wonderland

Posted on: January 5th, 2016 2 Comments

Looking for some winter fun? Join AARCH for one of the 2016 Winter Weekends at Great Camp Santanoni. These popular events are set for January 16-18 (Martin Luther King Day weekend), February 13-15 (President’s Day weekend), and March 12-13. The 10-mile round trip to the Camp on skies or snowshoes takes you through a wonderland of snow-covered woodland and mountain scenery before reaching the incredible collection of buildings at the end of the old road. Gently rolling hills and long easy flat stretches make it an inviting cross-country ski for novices. Just remember that what goes in, must come out and plan for several hours of >> More


The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

Posted on: December 7th, 2015 No Comments

By Virginia Siskavich. Here at the cozy AARCH offices in Keeseville, the season of giving kicked off early.  Apparently, we’ve been very good this year, as we’ve already been gifted with a National Trust award, as well as an award from New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation for our work at Camp Santanoni.  Thank you, Santa! But, if you’re still scrambling, looking for that special something for the good boys and girls on your holiday lists, we’ve got you covered.  Here’s a sampling of gifts available at the AARCH storefront, sure you to make you a gift-giving >> More


A Visit to Santanoni

Posted on: November 16th, 2015 No Comments

 By Annika Johnson.  We shared where we were from beneath a crisp Adirondack morning. Despite the wide range of backgrounds, we had all chosen Santanoni as a place to converge. The great camp was doing what it did best, drawing people in with a rustic charm and a true embodiment of the Adirondack Park. We learned a little about the history of Santanoni under the great stone arches that had welcomed so many before us. After the introduction, we walked to the carriages that would be carrying us one mile to the creamery and then five more to the larger >> More


Preservationists as Caretakers

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 No Comments

By Jennifer Betsworth. As winter fades into spring rains and warm days, my thoughts always drift toward summer weekends of hiking in the mountains, exploring new communities, and sleeping under the stars. For those lucky enough to own an Adirondack camp, whether it is a grand place on the water or a small cabin in the woods, I imagine it is time to call up the caretaker or plan a spring trip to check in. Having successfully slept through the winter, the camps are ready to wake up and revivify with the sound of laughter – and maybe a new >> More


Summer Preview

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 No Comments

By Kate Ritter. As we pack our winter coats away in favor of lighter layers, the AARCH staff is busy preparing for another full season of educational outings in the Adirondack Park and beyond.  In celebration of AARCH’s 25th anniversary, our schedule is more extensive than ever with many returning favorites and ten new offerings.  In addition to being memorable experiences, it is our hope that these tours provide a number of avenues to better understand various aspects of historic preservation.  Appreciation of our buildings, landscapes, and communities allows us to be more effective stewards of this special region. Sustainable preservation >> More


Paint Colors in Adirondack Architecture

Posted on: March 20th, 2015 1 Comment

By Mary B. Hotaling.  Choices of exterior colors for Adirondack buildings have historically been governed by availability of paints, preferences for style, and the owners’ desire for either visibility or privacy. One source of paint was provided by the mountains themselves.  “In the fall of 1893 D.M. Haley…discovered a deposit of ‘mineral paint’ near ‘Crain’ Mountain.”  According to River, Rails and Ski Trails, a history of the Town of Johnsburg, this deposit “is composed largely of aluminum combined with iron oxides.  The iron, being fully oxidized by the natural elements before it is mined, cannot undergo further change, while the >> More


Stewardship Through The Generations

Posted on: February 27th, 2015 1 Comment

By Kate Ritter. My inspiration for pursuing a career in historic preservation can be traced to many sources.  Growing up, my parents always sought opportunities to introduce us to the built environment through guided tours, books, adventures in the car and on-foot.  They made sure we all appreciated the satisfaction of squarely hammering a nail, and how to properly paint a room, feathering the final trim coat with prideful precision.  Knowing I wanted to play an active role in saving old buildings, I went from studying architecture at Bennington College, to entering the historic preservation master’s program at the University >> More


Built in 1832, Survived in 2011

Posted on: January 22nd, 2015 2 Comments

By Martha Spear. Our Upper Jay farmhouse has a sign on it saying it was built in 1832.  No one living knows for sure if that’s true.  I spent some hours in the Essex County, NY Clerk’s office looking up ownership records, and got back pretty far, but not to 1832.  So the handmade plaque hangs there on the front porch portico, daring anyone to prove it wrong. We bought the place in 2003 when the ADK home prices were booming, bringing the property’s ownership out of the Torrance family which had held it for generations.  We were part of >> More