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Posts Tagged ‘preservation’

So, What Is Public History?

Posted on: September 4th, 2018 No Comments

By Nolan Cool. “So…what is public history?” Folks attending Adirondack Architectural Heritage’s day-long tours ask me this all the time. My sarcastic answer is “it’s the opposite of private history,” followed by a more serious explanation that public history is applied history out in the world. A still unsatisfied, confused look prompts me to further explain that historic preservation projects, working with communities, public stakeholders, and local governments, museums, nonprofits, and other institutions on any project with history at its core qualifies as public history. My work as AARCH’s Educational Programs Director falls under this umbrella through public programming centered >> More


The Fun is About to Begin

Posted on: February 2nd, 2018 3 Comments

By Darren Tracy. Dr. Ferguson’s Office Restoration Blog#1  10.29.17 Restoration timeline: 10/6/17 – Learn of plans to possibly demolish 5 Culvert Street from AARCH (Adirondack Architectural Heritage) email. 10/10/17 – Contact Mayor Diamond asking if the demolition is a done deal, or if the City would entertain an offer to purchase. The mayor acknowledged that bids have been accepted to demolish the building but no contract has been awarded, stating the city would entertain an offer to sell instead of proceeding with demolition. 10/16/17 – My first impression was that this is a cute building but, too far gone to >> More


Discovering The Adirondacks in Washington Park

Posted on: April 5th, 2017 No Comments

By Tom Riley. In October 2016, AARCH ventured outside the Blue Line to tour Albany Rural and Oakwood Cemeteries.  One of the big draws, besides the elaborate and extensive architecturally significant buildings on both grounds, was that so many people connected to the Adirondacks are buried there.  This list includes Governor Marcy, geologist Ebenezer Emmons, entrepreneurs Archibald McIntyre and David Henderson, and Robert and Anna Pruyn, for whom Santanoni was built.  As part of this outing, we were able to include a last-minute bonus tour of Washington Park, a private ornamental park in Troy, NY.  The Park was established in >> More


How I Got to Lake Kora

Posted on: January 31st, 2017 No Comments

By Ed Hodges. On a plane in the late eighties I read an article about a glorious rustic hotel in an amazing setting, on a lake with mountain and valley views and a turn of the century golf course. Departing the plane, I neglected to take the magazine and promptly forgot the name, but the compelling image of the place was imprinted on my mind. Several years later, I acquired a copy of Harvey Kaiser’s “Great Camps of the Adirondacks” and thumbed through looking for that hotel. It was not in there, but there were many outstanding examples of rustic >> More


Patrimonio: What I Learned in Cuba

Posted on: September 9th, 2016 No Comments

By Mary-Nell Bockman. Since leading the first AARCH tour to Cuba in January, I’ve given slide presentations and interviews a half dozen times. The questions are always interesting and often provoke lively discussions about the differences and similarities in preservation work between the Adirondacks and Cuba. I can usually provide answers about the similar challenges we face: impact of the weather, lack of funds and resources, state bureaucracy, too many projects at once, the poor economy. But I’ve been thinking a lot about what’s different about historic preservation in Cuba and how to explain why I was so moved by what we saw on the >> More


Keeseville Quest: An Amazing Treasure Hunt

Posted on: July 28th, 2016 No Comments

“This is the coolest thing I’ve ever made,” exclaimed one fifth grader at the Keeseville Quest celebration at AARCH headquarters in June. We heartily agree that this is the coolest thing we’ve seen! So, what is this mysterious, very cool project? It’s the Keeseville Quest, a community treasure hunt created by three 5th grade classes at Keeseville Elementary School. The “treasure” is not gold or jewels, but even better, local landmarks! Quests progress from one place to another, ending at a final destination with a reward for successful completion. Questing was developed by Steven Glazer of Vermont and the idea behind it is simple: >> More


A Visit to Santanoni

Posted on: November 16th, 2015 No Comments

 By Annika Johnson.  We shared where we were from beneath a crisp Adirondack morning. Despite the wide range of backgrounds, we had all chosen Santanoni as a place to converge. The great camp was doing what it did best, drawing people in with a rustic charm and a true embodiment of the Adirondack Park. We learned a little about the history of Santanoni under the great stone arches that had welcomed so many before us. After the introduction, we walked to the carriages that would be carrying us one mile to the creamery and then five more to the larger >> More


Summer Preview

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 No Comments

By Kate Ritter. As we pack our winter coats away in favor of lighter layers, the AARCH staff is busy preparing for another full season of educational outings in the Adirondack Park and beyond.  In celebration of AARCH’s 25th anniversary, our schedule is more extensive than ever with many returning favorites and ten new offerings.  In addition to being memorable experiences, it is our hope that these tours provide a number of avenues to better understand various aspects of historic preservation.  Appreciation of our buildings, landscapes, and communities allows us to be more effective stewards of this special region. Sustainable preservation >> More


The Making of a Preservationist

Posted on: December 8th, 2014 No Comments

By Steven Engelhart. As the executive director of Adirondack Architectural Heritage and a contributing writer to The AARCHER, I’ll write about a lot of things closely connected to our work – preservation success stories and failures, interesting people that I meet along the way, my views on various regional preservation issues, the stories that historic places tell us, and highlight some of the educational events that we offer during the year. But you’ll also find me writing about other things, unrelated to my work, because I’m curious about practically everything that goes on here. I might muse about what makes >> More


Feeling Place: A Day at Dannemora

Posted on: November 6th, 2014 No Comments

By Kate Ritter. We often experience architecture by physical means – moving through a space, touching its walls, studying the way a truss is joined. But another important side of understanding a building is through the emotions it evokes.  These can be generated through accounts of people and historic events, and also through atmosphere, which tends to be less tangible. Twice this past summer, I co-lead an outing to Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, New York. This maximum-security prison, with its imposing concrete wall that seems to go on forever, envelopes a spectrum of architectural styles, and is a prime >> More