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Posts Tagged ‘preservation’

So, What Is Public History?

Posted on: September 4th, 2018 No Comments

By Nolan Cool. “So…what is public history?” Folks attending Adirondack Architectural Heritage’s day-long tours ask me this all the time. My sarcastic answer is “it’s the opposite of private history,” followed by a more serious explanation that public history is applied history out in the world. A still unsatisfied, confused look prompts me to further […]


The Fun is About to Begin

Posted on: February 2nd, 2018 3 Comments

By Darren Tracy. Dr. Ferguson’s Office Restoration Blog#1  10.29.17 Restoration timeline: 10/6/17 – Learn of plans to possibly demolish 5 Culvert Street from AARCH (Adirondack Architectural Heritage) email. 10/10/17 – Contact Mayor Diamond asking if the demolition is a done deal, or if the City would entertain an offer to purchase. The mayor acknowledged that […]


Discovering The Adirondacks in Washington Park

Posted on: April 5th, 2017 No Comments

By Tom Riley. In October 2016, AARCH ventured outside the Blue Line to tour Albany Rural and Oakwood Cemeteries.  One of the big draws, besides the elaborate and extensive architecturally significant buildings on both grounds, was that so many people connected to the Adirondacks are buried there.  This list includes Governor Marcy, geologist Ebenezer Emmons, […]


How I Got to Lake Kora

Posted on: January 31st, 2017 No Comments

By Ed Hodges. On a plane in the late eighties I read an article about a glorious rustic hotel in an amazing setting, on a lake with mountain and valley views and a turn of the century golf course. Departing the plane, I neglected to take the magazine and promptly forgot the name, but the […]


Patrimonio: What I Learned in Cuba

Posted on: September 9th, 2016 No Comments

By Mary-Nell Bockman. Since leading the first AARCH tour to Cuba in January, I’ve given slide presentations and interviews a half dozen times. The questions are always interesting and often provoke lively discussions about the differences and similarities in preservation work between the Adirondacks and Cuba. I can usually provide answers about the similar challenges we face: impact of […]


Keeseville Quest: An Amazing Treasure Hunt

Posted on: July 28th, 2016 No Comments

“This is the coolest thing I’ve ever made,” exclaimed one fifth grader at the Keeseville Quest celebration at AARCH headquarters in June. We heartily agree that this is the coolest thing we’ve seen! So, what is this mysterious, very cool project? It’s the Keeseville Quest, a community treasure hunt created by three 5th grade classes at Keeseville […]


A Visit to Santanoni

Posted on: November 16th, 2015 No Comments

 By Annika Johnson.  We shared where we were from beneath a crisp Adirondack morning. Despite the wide range of backgrounds, we had all chosen Santanoni as a place to converge. The great camp was doing what it did best, drawing people in with a rustic charm and a true embodiment of the Adirondack Park. We […]


Summer Preview

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 No Comments

By Kate Ritter. As we pack our winter coats away in favor of lighter layers, the AARCH staff is busy preparing for another full season of educational outings in the Adirondack Park and beyond.  In celebration of AARCH’s 25th anniversary, our schedule is more extensive than ever with many returning favorites and ten new offerings.  In […]


The Making of a Preservationist

Posted on: December 8th, 2014 No Comments

By Steven Engelhart. As the executive director of Adirondack Architectural Heritage and a contributing writer to The AARCHER, I’ll write about a lot of things closely connected to our work – preservation success stories and failures, interesting people that I meet along the way, my views on various regional preservation issues, the stories that historic […]


Feeling Place: A Day at Dannemora

Posted on: November 6th, 2014 No Comments

By Kate Ritter. We often experience architecture by physical means – moving through a space, touching its walls, studying the way a truss is joined. But another important side of understanding a building is through the emotions it evokes.  These can be generated through accounts of people and historic events, and also through atmosphere, which […]