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Posts Tagged ‘tour’

How I Got to Lake Kora

Posted on: January 31st, 2017 No Comments

By Ed Hodges. On a plane in the late eighties I read an article about a glorious rustic hotel in an amazing setting, on a lake with mountain and valley views and a turn of the century golf course. Departing the plane, I neglected to take the magazine and promptly forgot the name, but the compelling image of the place was imprinted on my mind. Several years later, I acquired a copy of Harvey Kaiser’s “Great Camps of the Adirondacks” and thumbed through looking for that hotel. It was not in there, but there were many outstanding examples of rustic >> More


Patrimonio: What I Learned in Cuba

Posted on: September 9th, 2016 No Comments

By Mary-Nell Bockman. Since leading the first AARCH tour to Cuba in January, I’ve given slide presentations and interviews a half dozen times. The questions are always interesting and often provoke lively discussions about the differences and similarities in preservation work between the Adirondacks and Cuba. I can usually provide answers about the similar challenges we face: impact of the weather, lack of funds and resources, state bureaucracy, too many projects at once, the poor economy. But I’ve been thinking a lot about what’s different about historic preservation in Cuba and how to explain why I was so moved by what we saw on the >> More


A Visit to Santanoni

Posted on: November 16th, 2015 No Comments

 By Annika Johnson.  We shared where we were from beneath a crisp Adirondack morning. Despite the wide range of backgrounds, we had all chosen Santanoni as a place to converge. The great camp was doing what it did best, drawing people in with a rustic charm and a true embodiment of the Adirondack Park. We learned a little about the history of Santanoni under the great stone arches that had welcomed so many before us. After the introduction, we walked to the carriages that would be carrying us one mile to the creamery and then five more to the larger >> More


Feeling Place: A Day at Dannemora

Posted on: November 6th, 2014 No Comments

By Kate Ritter. We often experience architecture by physical means – moving through a space, touching its walls, studying the way a truss is joined. But another important side of understanding a building is through the emotions it evokes.  These can be generated through accounts of people and historic events, and also through atmosphere, which tends to be less tangible. Twice this past summer, I co-lead an outing to Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, New York. This maximum-security prison, with its imposing concrete wall that seems to go on forever, envelopes a spectrum of architectural styles, and is a prime >> More